Author Archives: SubAir Systems

SubAir Systems Is Featured In World Golf

SubAir Systems is featured in World Golf, powered by the Golf Channel, for creating consistent experience for the 2014 Ryder Cup and Gleneagles. Helping to improve the quality of the greens at Gleneagles since it’s installation in 2011, SubAir’s subsurface aeration and moisture-control solutions battle the diverse climate and weather conditions in Scotland.

Scott Fenwick, Gleneagles’ estate manager states:

“The SubAir System is being used as an essential management tool, giving us a backup if we experience bad weather…We can maintain the moisture levels in our greens, quickly drawing moisture levels down even after significant rainfall, enabling play to continue.”

Read the full article in World Golf here to learn more about SubAir’s involvement in this year’s Ryder Cup.

 

Scout Features SubAir Systems

Scout features SubAir systems in their article summarizing this year’s Ryder Cup expectations. In the article, Scout mentions Gleneagles having “added the American Sub-Air drainage system for the familiar Scottish rains to make the fairways firm and fast and a special draining system for the bunkers first developed at Augusta National Golf Club”.

Gleneagles has installed one SubAir System at each green, which includes wireless sensors that report soil moisture, soil salinity, and soil temperature. The wireless sensors send that data back to the SubAir control panel and it identifies if the soil is within the optimum range for all major soil factors. If the soil is not within the optimum range, the completely automated SubAir System will make adjustments to change the soil temperature and moisture.

To learn more about SubAir’s involvement in this year’s Ryder Cup, read the full Scout article here.

SubAir Systems Is Featured In Yahoo Finance

SubAir Systems is featured in Yahoo Finance for being showcased at this year’s Ryder Cup at Gleneagles. SubAir’s subsurface aeration and moisture control solution systems are helping battle the diverse climate and weather conditions in Scotland at the 2014 Ryder Cup. Because each green is unique, every SubAir System is programmed individually so that all of the greens surfaces are consistent throughout Gleneagles, allowing each green to maintain their individual optimal soil ranges no matter the altitude or other soil factors of each green. Ryder Cup players will face a consistent putting and playing surface throughout the tournament.

SubAir Systems are installed at each green at the Ryder cup, sensing increases in temperature and automatically blowing cooler air to lower the green’s temperature and maintain the optimal level. Consistency of the greens is key for the success of the Ryder Cup.

Read the full feature in Yahoo Finance here.

SubAir Systems Is Featured In The Scotsman

SubAir Systems is featured in The Scotsman in an interview with Gleneagles’ Greenkeeper, Scott Fenwick, for improving the quality of the greens at Gleneagles in this year’s Ryder Cup. The underground SubAir System provides aeration, soil moisture control and drainage solutions, allowing consistent surfaces and player conditions across the entire course. Players, fans, and press can worry less about Scotland’s rain and soggy conditions, and focus more on player performance at this year’s Ryder Cup.

A quote from Scott Fenwick’s interview is below:

“The sub-air system is…a management tool that has helped us in the management of the greens and they are certainly performing much better now.”

Read the full interview in The Scotsman here.

The Telegraph Features SubAir Systems

For the 2014 Ryder Cup, Gleneagles has installed one SubAir System at each green, which includes wireless sensors that report soil moisture, soil salinity, and soil temperature. SubAir Systems have been helping improve the quality of the greens at Gleneagles since it’s installation in 2011, and now SubAir is showcased in it’s entirety. The Telegraph references SubAir Systems as “sophisticated…drainage system beneath every green”. A quote from the article is below:

“It’s a lot better than it used to be,” said one Gleneagles member, who asked not to be named. “The 18th used to be a really dull hole, but it’s a really interesting finish now and everyone loves it.”

Read the article in it’s entirety here.